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Castle of our Skins – Chamber music from the African Continent and Diaspora

08 May
Sheldonian Theatre
Broad Street
Oxford
OX1 3AZ

Castle of our Skins - Chamber music from the African Continent and Diaspora
Image courtesy of Music at Oxford / Oxford University

About Castle of our Skins

Chamber music from the African Continent and Diaspora

Music in Oxford is pleased to present a concert in partnership with TORCH to celebrate chamber music from the African continent and diaspora.

Pianist Samantha Ege and the Castle of our Skins string quartet give the UK premieres of works by South African composer Bongani Ndodana-Breen (b. 1975) and African American composers Florence Price (1887-1953), Undine Smith Moore (1904-1989), and Frederick C. Tillis (1930-2020) in this illuminating concert.

Castle of our Skins is a concert and educational series dedicated to celebrating Black artistry through music. From classrooms to concert halls, Castle of our Skins invites explorations into Black heritage and culture, spotlighting both unsung and celebrated figures of past and present.

Castle of our Skins is deeply aware of the lack of equity in composer representation on concert stages and the omission of important stories and figures in Black history. It is this lack of equity that this series seeks to change. ​

Through carefully designed educational workshops and creative concert programs, the series aims to highlight the achievements of Black artists and historical figures. It has been hailed in the New York Times and Boston Globe as a beacon for diversity in the arts.

Concession tickets are available for under 18s, students and those on Job Seeker’s Allowance.

Dr Samantha Ege is a musicologist, pianist, and the Lord Crewe Junior Research Fellow in Music at Lincoln College, University of Oxford. She belongs to a new generation of practitioners redefining classical music and illuminating the diversity of its past, present, and future.

Samantha’s performances and publications shed important light on composers from underrepresented backgrounds. In 2021, she received the American Musicological Society’s Noah Greenberg Award for her recording project on five female composer-pianists from the Black Renaissance era.

And before that, in 2019, she received both the Society for American Music’s Eileen Southern Fellowship and a Newberry Library Short-Term Residential Fellowship for her work on women’s contributions to concert life in interwar Chicago.

This event is brought to you by the Humanities Cultural Programme at Oxford University. To find out more about the project, please visit https://www.torch.ox.ac.uk/castle-of-our-skins