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October Books of the Month

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October Books of the Month
October Books of the Month

From a Massachusetts plantation to the outer reaches of the solar system; our pick of the month’s best books.

A new month has just started, which means we’ve got a bunch of new books of the month you won’t want to miss.

A touchingly humane exploration, both of our world and those beyond the stars; hysteria and persecution in 17th-century America; a page-turning retelling of a famous author’s vanishing; and a vivid children’s fantasy suffused with the danger and darkness of prehistory. Discover our sensational quartet of Books of the Month for October.

Bewilderment by Richard Powers
Bewilderment by Richard Powers

Fiction Book of the Month is Richard Powers’ Bewilderment. Shortlisted for the Booker Prize 2021, it’s an arresting tale about the need to keep those we love safe that follows a widowed young father faced with the task of bringing up his son who has a little-understood health condition.

The Ruin of All Witches by Malcolm Gaskill
The Ruin of All Witches by Malcolm Gaskill

The Non-Fiction Book of the Month is Malcolm Gaskill’s, The Ruin of All Witches, which charts the events and psychological effects of witch-hunting in a small community of early settlers in 1650s Massachusetts in gripping and thought-provoking prose.

The Christie Affair by Nina de Gramont
The Christie Affair by Nina de Gramont

Nina de Gramont’s The Christie Affair is the Thriller of the Month. Taking Agatha Christie’s 11-day disappearance in 1926 as a jumping-off point, de Gramont’s deftly constructed mystery is a delight for fans of both the Queen of Crime and Golden Age whodunits in general.

Fireborn by Aisling Fowler
Fireborn by Aisling Fowler

Packed full of unforgettable characters and compelling plotting, Fireborn, the Children’s Book of the Month by Aisling Fowler, is set in a richly imagined prehistoric world where a courageous young Huntling braves the forbidding Northern forests in search of a missing girl.

Whether it’s horror, fantasy, fiction or history, there’s something for everyone, so go take a look at the full list on the Waterstones website.


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